Chasing Ideas: The Fun of Freeing Your Child's Imagination. Revised ed

Chasing Ideas: The Fun of Freeing Your Child's Imagination. Revised edition*

Product Number : 102921600X

  • Most important thing parents can do for their children is to encourage them to think
  • Children really enjoy thinking and this book builds on that enjoyment
  • To have confidence in one?s own thinking is the foundation for a happy and successful life
  • Shows parents of children aged 3 to 15 how to encourage them to explore ideas, think, judge, make decisions and communicate effectively and to develop these important life skills to take into adulthood

by Christine Durham


The most important thing parents can do for their children is to encourage them to think. Children really enjoy thinking and this book builds on that enjoyment. To have confidence in ones own thinking is the foundation for a happy and successful life.




Edward de Bono



Christine Durham shows how to help children be better, brighter thinkers and helps parents and teachers discover the joys of discussing ideas with children. Chasing Ideas shows parents of children aged 3 to 15 how to encourage them to explore ideas, think, judge, make decisions and communicate effectively and to develop these important life skills to take into adulthood. The authors treasure trove of techniques, tips and activities will help children:




let their imagination and natural curiosity reign free and find out about why things happen, how things are and how they might be



fall in love with ideas so that they see and understand more, and think creatively



unlock their minds and their potential to become ingenious thinkers, and
open up issues and explore ideas by using the Handy Thinking tools practical thinking skills that are fun and easy to remember.



Chasing Ideas will help parents and teachers enrich, broaden and deepen their relationships with children; expand their childrens horizons; explore issues, ideas and understanding with children in a delightful way. It will also empower children, and enhance their self-confidence and self-esteem.


Extract from Chasing ideas with children


All children paint like geniuses.


What we do to them so quickly dulls the ability.


Pablo Picasso 1881-1973



When I was a child I was enthralled by the romance and beauty of the mighty ship, the Titanic, the epitome of sophistication, design and technology being sunk in those silent, inky black, icy waters. The figurehead of civilisation, scuttled and sunk by a simple lump of ice. The might of nature, victorious over the brilliance and complexity of humans. This concept and the mystery of the story of the Titanic still capture the imagination of children; they are fascinated by it.


On board the Titanic


Recently, the Titanic floated to the surface of a discussion I was having with a group of eight-year-olds. We were discussing a charming Mexican story that concerned the idea about 'rich' people and 'poor' people. After the fourth child began talking by referring to the Titanic, I was nonplussed. What on earth did the Titanic have to do with this Mexican story? My head was buzzing with all sorts of queries: Don't these kids know what we're talking about? And Hello-o! Have I missed something? Then the penny dropped. The movie Titanic (which they'd all seen and were passionate about) was a clear example of the class system and the comparison between rich and poor people. 'You little beauties!' I whispered under my breath. Without fail, kids come up trumps thinking about connecting and clarifying ideas.


We had an excited, animated discussion (and a huge argument) about the good and bad points of being rich or poor. When we looked for curious points, some wonderful sweeping statements were born from the children's ideas. Notions of 'goodness' or 'badness' and whether a person is good or bad depending on whether they are rich or poor were discussed, and generalisations were examined with great fervour. Convincing reasons and examples were argued about and 'proof ' was debated.


Who or what sank the Titanic?


I wondered this question aloud (as if the children had made me think of it). For some, the question was like a red rag to a bull (just as I'd hoped). They were leaping about on their seats because they knew the answer. 'It was an iceberg!' (Don't you know anything?) No sooner were the words out of their mouths than I could see realisation dawning. Oh, it wasn't that simple.


Some of the things they identified as playing a part in the Titanic sinking included the iceberg, the owners wanting to make lots of money trying to break the record from London to New York, speed, and thinking the ship was unsinkable. The more we discussed things the more it became apparent that an idea (the Titanic is unsinkable) was responsible for sinking the great ship. Powerful stuff!


Contents: Introduction: Falling in love with ideas. 1. Chasing ideas with children. 2. The ten basic principles. 3. Thinking about thinking. 4. Record it! 5. Handy Thinking keys and tools. 6. Creating the atmosphere. 7. Getting the message across. 8. Enhanced Thinking. 9. Enhanced Thinking in action. 10. Pigeonhole it. 11. Play good, bad and curious. 12. Whats in our daily bread. 13. The broken vase. 14. Using events as keys to discussion. 15. Finding stories in books and films. 16. Using the media. 17. Thinking tools can help you out. 18. Tell me a story. Hear yourself think. Chasing ideas in schools. Think, think, think. Authors notes. Acknowledgements. Sources. Index.


Paperback, 192 pages

 




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